Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DarkHelmet

Civilization 6: All roads lead to Rome

Recommended Posts

I've been playing the Civilization series since I got Civilization 2(Gold Edition) back on an old Power Macintosh in the 90's(yes I've been playing for a long time lol). The game has undergone a rather vivid transformation over the years, most notably in the GUI department where instead of a plain map with bland terrain features and inanimate pictures for units to one with a more defined environment filled with units that actually move, attack and show signs of life. If your new to the series, the game shouldn't be too hard to pick up. Its those that have played Civ 5 that might take a bit longer to learn the ropes because we've become used to the Civ 5 parameters. The biggest change, as I see it, is the change towards City States. No longer are they a source for Gold and Workers like they were in Civ 5(where aggressive players/Civs would demand tribute on a daily basis). Now its much more beneficial to keep them alive as crazy as it sounds because they provide a passive bonus to your Empire each and every turn in the form of +Science, +Production(two forms of it too), +Culture or +Gold depending on the type of City State. Its even better if you can manage to get them to become your Ally, wherein they provide a unique bonus to your Empire that can turn the tide in your favor(in addition to whatever military or resources they happen to have at their disposal). The other change is that there is now two tech trees: One for Science that we're all accustomed to but one now for Culture that forces players to not neglect one's own Culture as the Culture tree unlocks more advanced forms of Government and Wonders that can help you advance Technologically and Spiritually(aka Religious).

 

When trying the game out for the first time(mind you I'm still a beginner and probably won't play much due to love of other games and the fact someone monopolizes it... *cough*), I chose Rome on a True start location game. This brought back memories of Civilization 2&3 where Civilizations could be made to start where they actually existed. Rome has always been a favorite of mine, be it in Civ 2, 3, 4 or 5. Their Legions retained the ability to build a Roman Fort from Civ 5 but lost their Civ 5 trait of building Roads. The reason for this is because they don't have to :D. Every Roman City you found(or capture) is yielded two distinct perks. Firstly they're granted a free City Center building(which in most cases is a Monument) and a Trading Post. Through the Monument and Trading Post, they quickly boost Culture while at the same time expanding your Trade Network since the Trading Post establishes a Road Network to all nearby Trading Posts. Meaning every town in your Empire will have a Road leading to it, hence all roads lead to Rome. This Road perk pays HUGE dividends as it means two things. 1) You don't have to trade domestically to generate the roads/trading posts(saving you time that could be spent trading with City-States and other/more lucrative routes) and 2) You don't have to train Military Engineers to build them later on in the game if you never get around to it. This means sending reinforcements on a military campaign is much easier and makes Rome a very versatile Domination Victory Civilization as Trading Posts are automatically established on Foreign Continents(meaning if a Civ fails to generate them on their own, you will do so for your own benefit). As far as I know there are no Railroads, which is another change that might surprise some people. To those who are new, Railroads drastically lower movement point cost on terrain, making moving units extremely easy, which made life in Civ 5 and previous generations so much easier.

 

The newest addition to the game are Districts. These Districts are placed within a city's radius and tailor to a specific theme: Encampment(Military), Holy Site(Religious), Campus(Science), Theater Square(Culture), Entertainment(Amenities or Keep people happy), Industrial Zone(Production), Commercial(Gold), Harbor(Naval Production/Sea Resource Production), Aqueducts(Fresh Water/Housing), Neighborhoods(Housing), Aerodrome(Air Units) and Space Center(Space Exploration and necessary for Science Victory). As one who's played the game before, these Districts are based off what Great People would create in cities or as a terrain improvement in past iterations of the game. Furthermore, these Districts house structures(like a Library for example) that would normally all be squeezed into a single city tile in past iterations of the game. As luck would have it, these Districts generate Great People points of the type in question when manned by Civilians in the Town they're built in and receive bonuses from City-States if you have enough Diplomatic Influence with them(hence why you should keep them alive!!). Some Civilizations have unique Districts that are more powerful than their generic cousin. See Civ 6 Districts for more info. In addition, Wonders are placed on actual tiles, making building them a bit more delicate as one can't simply spam them all into one city like before. Careful planning and placement of Wonders and Districts is the key to your long-term success. List of Wonders: Civ 6 Wonders. Natural Wonders(like Mount Everest) yield particular buffs as well and colonizing around them can pay off if your fortunate enough to be near one. Natural Wonders list

 

When playing my game I purposely selected my opponents. I chose both Greek Leaders(Gorgo(Sparta) and Pericles(Athens). Alexander is in the next expansion that hasn't been released yet), along with China, Japan, America, Aztecs and Brazil in a Standard 8 player, 12 City-State game on a True Start Location(Earth) map. I chose both Greek leaders with the hopes of catching one of them as they're off trying to settle their capital(since one would obviously colonize first) but as luck would have it, both were too close to my capital of Rome and I managed to get both of their Settlers(thereby eliminating both of them from the game prior to them even starting. Call it an exploit if you want to but it gives anyone willing to try it a strong early game push with 3 cities(which with Rome's unique perks is huge). With them now gone, I have no one near me as the closest Civilizations were on the other side of Asia or across the Atlantic, hence I was free to expand at will with only Barbarians in my way. As luck would have it, there were 5 City States nearby: Carthage(Military and its a real shame they're a city state... would love to have Hannibal vs. Scipio again lol), Hattusa(Science), Kabul(Military), Kumasi(Culture) and Zanzibar(Gold). Furthermore, their unique benefits were ideal for Rome: Carthage expands Trade Route capacity for each Encampment District, Hattusa yields a copy of every Strategic Resource you've revealed but do not own(that's HUGE since it makes upgrading/building units of the next era much easier), Kabul doubles experience gained from battles you initiate, Kumasi adds a Cultural modifier to all Trade Routes to City States(meaning with each Trade Route to a City State is +Culture, hence isn't that hard with Carthage perk) and Zanzibar yields two unique Luxury Resources, granting 6 Amenities each Empire-Wide. That's on top of +Production to Military Units(Carthage/Kabul) in Capital and Encampments, +Culture in Capital and all Theater Districts(Kumasi), +Gold in Capital and all Commercial Districts(Zanzibar) and +Science in Capital and all Campus Districts(Hattusa). See a full list of City-States here: City States

 

As you can imagine, with 5 City-States largely to my own, I advanced rather rapidly and quickly explored the rest of the world, meeting my remaining competitors and earning their jealous ire. Brazil and America, in particular, were the ones to get their fate sealed first. I had an inkling something was about to go down when America used a Spy to sabotage one of my Industrial Districts(it died in the process). About 10 turns or so later, Brazil and America both declared war on me(joint war) and having few military units at the time(I had no reason to have one with no one around me), I was a bit unprepared like America was at the start of WW2. However, I was vastly more advanced in terms of Research compared to everyone and had more advanced units and far better production with virtually every city in my Empire having an Industrial District. Furthermore, I had the Venetian Arsenal Wonder(see: Venetian Arsenal) that might be the best Wonder in the game from the Military side of things. Therefore, I had that city cranking out ships left and right(which wasn't a problem with a Harbor District complete with a Shipyard) and soon had a Battleship Armada(several of them actually) quickly and effectively taking control of the Atlantic while my meager but far more advanced land military made their way to South America(as Brazil was the bigger threat). I underestimated just how many damn Knights they had though because I must had killed like 10 with a single Battleship Armada alone by Buenos Aires and countless more with my land units but alas I lost an Infantry unit to them. I avenged that loss by quickly steamrolling the continent, effectively using my Battleships and an Artillery unit to bombard and remove city and encampment fortifications. Before moving up the Central American Peninsula, I got an Aerodrome District and began cranking out Air units and Carriers while a few land cities began cranking out my latest technological advancement: Tanks :D. America fell much more quickly than Brazil did and I attribute much of that to the fact that their military was embarked in the Atlantic to invade either Africa or Europe where I resided. Subsequently my Battleships caught them at sea and basically eliminated them at will. Any naval assets either civilization had were meager and no match for what I had so I basically had superiority in all 3 facets: Land, Naval and Air(this one I had supreme control because no one else had any LOL). As Sun Tzu would say: WTF were they thinking?

 

I declared war on the Aztecs because I shrewdly became allies with two city states in North and South America: Toronto and Buenos Aires(Both Industrial City States with exceptional Ally perks) and the Aztecs stupidly declared war on Toronto(I was at peace with Aztecs at the time). This gave me the ideal excuse to declare war on them to protect Toronto and essentially steamrolled my way through North America(and in much faster fashion than South America since I had to fight Brazil's land army on land without air support). After they fell, I switched my attention to the two remaining Civs. They didn't put up much of a fight after I formally declared war(I mean what can you do with Musketman against Mechnanized Infantry and Modern Armor, not to mention Jet Fighters and B-52's(Jet Bombers)) and I quickly won a Domination victory after I captured Japan's Capital with a Destroyer Armada(yes Naval melee ships can kick some ass!!).

 

The game was released with the Aztecs as a special addition to those who pre-ordered but was later added in as a DLC 90 days after launch. Several more DLC's have been released since then but I only have the base version plus Aztecs. Another DLC is slated to be added later this year with several new Civilizations(including Alexander for Greece if I'm not mistaken). Ironically the Mongols are missing still from the Civilization list(AFAIK) and one could argue they had an instrumental impact on the formation of Asia and Europe but maybe they plan to add them later on in another DLC. Mayans and Incas are also missing from the Civilization list having been in past Civilization iterations(same with Sioux). Overall though I give this game a solid 9.5/10. I would have given it a 10 but its missing a building queue and honestly that annoys the hell out of me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this  

×